Labguru Steps up to the Plate

Though Jeter is no longer stepping up to the plate, we're just getting started. In close consultation with customers including Victoria Yoon from Gladstone's Huang Lab and Alexander Chamessian from Duke's Ji Lab we've rolled out the ability to add a plate element to your protocol and experiment layouts. You may select the plate size, and quickly define the contents of each well. Here's a short video to see it in action:

Well, well, well. Researchers may now easily and intuitively define the contents of each well in their plates, and link each sample and plate to its experiment. 

As always, researchers can connect plates and samples to make it easy to keep track of your research activities.

We're already working on improving the plate layout, with plans like:

  • Adding tool-tips when hovering above each well
  • Saving plates in storage
  • Importing plate reader data files

What other functionality would you like to see? Join the discussion below!

Annotate Images on @labguru

Requested by many users, Labguru now supports image annotations. No matter where your image belongs - whether in a document, milestone, protocol or an experiment's result - you can now quickly annotate it. Draw attention and better document what is seen.

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We know that you generate tons of images, now it is easier to embed these and draw / write on them, highlighting key features. 

Once you annotate your images, you can download the annotated file or the original:

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Also annotated images will appear on your timeline, pdf reports for projects and experiments. 

If you've already uploaded images to your Labguru account, try annotating one now. Or open a 30-day free trial to get started.

Happy annotating!

Lenny and ZappyLab: His Twisted Path to Science Start-Up Success

Lenny and ZappyLab: His Twisted Path to Science Start-Up Success

A college math major isn’t the most likely candidate to help establish a growing and successful suite of products supporting life science research. And hearing him describe it, the twisted path from math to biology start-up seems like an adventurous hike up a mountain. In the early days of millennium, Lenny Teytleman was a math major at Columbia with a serious disdain for biology. His path began to warp in his final year of college. While picking up a CompSci minor on the side, he “accidentally took a computational biology class,” and realized…“Oh crap! Biology is what I want to do!” And so Lenny entered grad school in Berkeley for a Computational and Experimental Biology degree. He spent 6 years learning to biology side of life – learning how to do experiments, and how not to do experiments. He fell in love with the lifestyle – “I love teaching, I love research” – and so decided to remain in academia and started pursuing a post-doc at MIT...

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Romance in the Lab

Romance in the Lab

Reflecting on my Ph.D studies, I realize how much time I spent in the lab, in the presence of my lab colleagues. In effect, I spent more time with my colleagues than with my spouse and son! Considering the life style of scientists, working long hours with more frustrations than happiness, sometimes a lab colleague can understand your predicament better than your friends back home. With so much time at the lab and a common interest at hand, it is not surprising that you hear about scientists finding love in between their experiments and classes...

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Open Access vs. Subscription-Based Scientific Publications

Open Access vs. Subscription-Based Scientific Publications

The scientific publication niche is a bottomless pot of gold, with more than $9 billion annual revenue (as of 2011) from readers/universities (subscription-based journals) and from the authors themselves (open-access journals). This is not surprising, since scientific endeavor has never reclined, and with the fierce competition for academic positions, scientific publication rates will likely only increase. The recent decade has seen the rise of the open access journal publications which offer a slightly different concept of peer-reviewed scientific publication to the more traditional subscription-based journals.

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The CRISPR Phenomenon

The CRISPR Phenomenon

"The science of today is the technology of tomorrow"  - Edward Teller

Scientific progress is the end result of current and past research. Only a few scientific discoveries in history have singularly influenced humanity, such as those whose discovery ignited further rapid successions of discoveries. The development of the atom bomb is one such example, in which 12 years of scientific research brought a concept held by Dr. Leo Szilard (1933) to realization and the devastation of two Japanese cities. The CRISPR phenomenon is another discovery associated with rapid technological progression and which inspires many scientists world wide.

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5 Reasons To Use Google Calendar In Your Lab

5 Reasons To Use Google Calendar In Your Lab

It is common to hear the phrase "Time is Money" in the industrial sector, yet it is less heard in the halls of academia. If there is any pressure in academia, it is to publish as much as possible and in some cases, the need to publish quickly in light of fierce competition that might scoop an important discovery. Whatever the reason, time management is crucial in science, whether it is at cutting edge of drug discovery in a pharma company or in a small academic lab revealing a new function for an oncoprotein. The most common time management tool is the calendar, whether paper-based or digital. Google Calendar, part of Google's free software, is among the most popular calendar software used today by many professionals. If you haven't started using Google calendar in your research, here are five reasons why you should start using it right away:

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Scientific Journals - Who Gets Authorship Credit?

Scientific Journals - Who Gets Authorship Credit?

The seed of scientific publication was planted back in the 17th century by the Royal Society's first secretary, Henry Oldenburg, who founded and edited the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society journal. In those times scientists tended to conduct research independently and thus the crediting of ownership was straightforward. Today, with globalization, advanced technologies, more than 25,000 scientific journals, and 6 million scientists, competition is fierce and science has become an arena of both collaborations and rivalry. Scientists are measured by their scientific output (publications) and their respective rank among other publications (journal impact factor). The "publish or perish" phrase is heard along the lab corridors and pushes students and researchers to work harder, search for solutions to technical difficulties and forge intra- and inter laboratory collaborations. Thus the number of single author publications declines and the issue of authorship and credits takes place over scientific passion.

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Research Task Management With Labguru

Research Task Management With Labguru

When it comes to running research smoothly, one trick is to verify at least one day ahead of conducting an experiment that you’ve got all the reagents you'll need. Otherwise, you will step into the lab all smiles, put on your lab coat, fresh new latex gloves and bang your head against the wall for not having enough autoclave ddWater or fresh buffers. Or realize someone else scheduled the centrifuge for the whole day. You just need to remember those things in advance, that’s all.

Since it likely happens a lot when you have so many other things on your mind, it would be nice if someone else would do the planning, the remembering and the reminding. I can’t offer a robot to do all this planning, but I can offer a little help from Labguru.

 

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Nobel Prize in Medicine Runner-Ups

Nobel Prize in Medicine Runner-Ups

Since 2002 the Thomson's citation data has been used to predict the coming year's Nobel Laureates, as part of the ScienceWatch web resource (SW). The list is derived from Thomson Reuters Web of Knowledge and has been somewhat predictive of the actual Nobel laureates.  And while Professors Rothman, Schekman, and Südhof, this year's ultimate winners, weren't on the SW list, it's worth having a look at these "runner-ups". Who knows - some of the names below might well be awarded The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2014!

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